The tenth annual U.S. Chamber International IP Index evaluates IP rights in 55 global economies across 50 unique indicators — from patent and copyright policies to commercialization of IP assets and ratification of international treaties. The Index illustrates that economies with the most effective intellectual property (IP) frameworks are more likely to achieve the socio-economic benefits needed to face our biggest challenges, like COVID-19.

Key Findings

Over the last decade, the global IP environment improved, but challenges remain.
Over the last decade, the global IP environment improved, but challenges remain.

While 45 of 53 economies profiled by the Index have improved their scores, most economies still fail to offer a gold standard IP framework.

New tools to combat infringement are helping lead to a decrease in online piracy.
New tools to combat infringement are helping lead to a decrease in online piracy.

While online piracy remains a major issue, new tools to combat IP infringement online are helping to strengthen protection for IP owners and lead to a decrease in online piracy.

Over ten years, the global fight against fake goods hasn’t kept pace with the growth of counterfeits.
Over ten years, the global fight against fake goods hasn’t kept pace with the growth of counterfeits.

Despite the scale of trade in counterfeit goods, estimated at $500 billion annually, most economies fall short in effective enforcement strategies to combat fake goods.

IP-intensive goods and services were critical to the global response to COVID-19.
IP-intensive goods and services were critical to the global response to COVID-19.

IP is at the heart of the solutions that emerged to combat COVID-19, from vaccines and therapeutics to enabling communications like virtual meeting software and 5G.

Some economies propose weakening the IP protections responsible for COVID-related innovation.
Some economies propose weakening the IP protections responsible for COVID-related innovation.

Despite the critical role of IP-enabled solutions in fighting COVID-19, some WTO members are pushing to “waive” international IP commitments.

“An effective IP system will be critical to ensuring the global community can continue to deliver the next generation of innovative and creative goods and services to compete for a better tomorrow.”

“Innovators are constantly competing to deliver the best, brightest tomorrow. Public policy can spur them along – or it can stop them altogether.”